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LaTeX for producing documents with scientific formulas, complex math equations, or special notations

LaTeX is a document preparation system for high-quality typesetting. It is most often used for medium-to-large technical or scientific documents but it can be used for almost any form of publishing.

If you need to produce documents with scientific formulas, complex math equations, or any special notations, take a look at the LaTeX system. It uses plain text files that contain formatting commands and works with other authoring tools (such as Word, RoboHelp, and Framemaker).

LaTex input and corresponding output

LaTex input and corresponding output

As the originator of the research that resulted in my post about free PDF tools, credit goes to my friend and former colleague and manager Marshall Bloom for sharing this LaTeX resource.

Further research shows that you can convert LaTeX

If you want to do a LaTeX-to-XML conversion, take a look at LaTeXML http://dlmf.nist.gov/LaTeXML/. LaTeXML is a program, written in Perl, that attempts to faithfully mimic TeX’s behaviour, but produces XML instead of dvi. The document model of the target XML makes explicit the model implied by LaTeX.

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About barriebyron

Innovative, DITA-using information developer specializing in presenting complex ideas in ways that are clear and concise. Persistent optimist, intrepid adventurer, mentor. Builder of relationships, connecting friends and peers to people they want to know. Toastmaster, social duct tape, and generator of goodwill. Follow me on twitter @barriebyron

Discussion

One thought on “LaTeX for producing documents with scientific formulas, complex math equations, or special notations

  1. I have just used LaTeXML to convert a cookery book marked up in LaTeX to EPUB and Kindle (using a Perl script to do some cleanup and the packaging of the output from LaTeXML). I am now looking at how LaTeX and LaTeXML (and Perl) can be put to use to generate DITA content (there is a thread on the LaTeXML mailing list about this).

    Posted by Andrew Ford | November 22, 2011, 11:49 am

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